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Msgr. Robert Hugh Benson

Msgr. Robert Hugh Benson (18 November 1871 – 19 October 1914) was the youngest son of Edward White Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury, and younger brother of Edward Frederic Benson. Benson was educated at Eton College, and then studied Classics and Theology at Trinity College, Cambridge, from 1890 to 1893. In 1895, he was ordained a priest in the Church of England by his father, Edward White Benson, who was then Archbishop of Canterbury and therefore head of the Anglican Church. As such, his son's conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1903, and his subsequent ordination, caused a sensation.

His father died suddenly in 1896, and Benson was sent on a trip to the Middle East to recover his own health. While there, he began to question the status of the Church of England and to consider the claims of the Roman Catholic Church. His own piety began to tend toward the High Church variety, and he started exploring religious life in various Anglican communities, eventually obtaining permission to join the Community of the Resurrection. Benson made his profession as a member of the community in 1901, at which time he had no thoughts of leaving the Church of England. But as he continued his studies and began writing, he became more and more uneasy with his own doctrinal position, and on 11 September 1903 he was received into the Roman Catholic Church. Not since Newman's conversion almost 60 years earlier had the reception of a convert into the Church caused such a commotion. Shudders of shock shook the Anglican establishment. He was ordained a Catholic priest in 1904 and sent to Cambridge. He continued his writing career along with the usual elements of priestly ministry. He was named a monsignor in 1911. Before his untimely death in 1914 at the age of 43, he would write 15 highly successful novels as well as many other books on the Catholic faith. He was a friend of Chesterton and they were in mutual admiration of eah other’s literary works. Both Chesterton and Ronald Knox admitted the influence of Benson on their own conversions.
Robert Hugh Benson: Life and Works
, a biography by Janet Grayson was published in 1998. This 68 page book is an abridgement of his famous work titled Christ and His Church. Two of his best known novels are Come Rack, Come Rope and Lord of the World.

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Dom Lorenzo Scupoli, 240, Softcover

St. Francis de Sales carried a copy of this in his pocket for 18 years! Its wisdom formed his soul, it inspired him to a life of the deepest devotion, and ultimately it helped him become one of the Church's greatest saints and doctor's! It's no longer fashionable to speak of the Christian life as a "battle", but there's actually no better way to describe the tug-of-war for your soul that's raging right now between the forces of light and darkness. Here, Dom Lorenzo Scupoli helps you take your proper part in this spiritual battle so that you can win, decisively, the war for your soul. This book has been loved by saints and sinners alike ever since it was written four hundred years ago. Why? Because it offers sensible advice to help you overcome spiritual obstacles and achieve spiritual perfection! Dom Lorenzo Scupoli was a disciple of St. Andrew Avellino, the great preacher and spiritual director. His classic Spiritual Combat was first published in Venice in 1589.

 

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Timothy O' Donnell, 292, Softcover

Ireland, in its halcyon years, was commonly called the land of saints and scholars by a grateful Christendom. And, although the emerald isle, like other Catholic nations, had not only its peaks of sanctity but its lows of spiritual tepidity (as we see manifest everywhere today), the land of the Gaels has rarely, if ever, been without her martyrs. Be it at the hands of pagan Viking marauders, Puritan savages or the rapacious imperialists of perfidious Albion, Ireland has drunk from the Lord’s chalice deeply and often. This stirring account of a very crucial period in Irish history was written by historian Timothy T. O’Donnell, a worthy son of the illustrious O’Donnell clan, who now serves as president of Christendom College. With that Catholic reverence that only a filial piety nurtured in the holy Faith can generate, the author brings to life a somewhat obscure slice of Irish history that ought to stand out prominently in the annals of heroic struggles against draconian injustice. This is the story of the Catholic uprising of the three Hughs: Hugh O’Donnell, Red Hugh, his valiant son, and Hugh O’Neill, Earl of Tyrone, master dissembler and cunning diplomat, whom Queen Elizabeth preferred to call "Beelzebub." Beginning in 1595, the war for liberty and the reign of Christ the King grew in strength victory by victory, such wise that by 1599 all of Ireland was ruled by native Irishmen as an independent Catholic Kingdom. It was to be a short-lived independence ending with the pathos of the "Flight of the Earls" in 1603 and the toxic murder in Spain of Red Hugh, "the son of prophecy," by an English spy. The battle cry of the mighty warriors of "The O’Donnell," Red Hugh, may now be silent, though not ever silenced: "Papa Aboo!" (The Pope to victory!) For in Gaelic hearts "the visible King" of the isle will forever be the Vicar of Christ.

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1605700258, Hilaire Belloc, 112, Paperback
This essay will help a great deal in educating the reader in regard to the problem and the remedy. Belloc provides a lucid and straightforward analysis of the prevalent demise of the social order in Christendom, while, at the same time, laying out a truly Catholic economic system that can gradually – if there is a growth of interest and desire – be planted and nurtured. Such a system, which the great thinker calls distributism, will only materialize if it grows naturally in this or that local environment ready and determined to assimilate it organically. Both Capitalism (note: not free enterprise) and Communism (along with its weak sister, Socialism) are completely condemned and exposed for the anti-Catholic, self-defeating and self-destructive economic structures that they are. This book was not written to condemn industry (or technology). Man is inventive by nature. When he manufactures a product he assumes that the product is a good that will enhance the quality of the multiple activities that make for an abundant life. What Belloc sees as destructive, and the reader will find it obvious, is the usurpation of ownership of the means of production (i.e., property) by a wealthy oligarchy of financiers. What we end up with is the crushing of the local and independent tradesman, craftsman, baker and farmer and their replacement by the monopoly. As the brilliantly written introduction to this book by IHS Press puts it: Belloc's vision was nothing less than "a science of reality, based upon a conception not merely of what is . . . but, more importantly, of what ought to be according to the divine and natural law."
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Reverend G. E. Phillips, 160, Paperback

Rev. G. E. Phillips

This history of the Holy House of Loreto is the most decisive work in English defending the authenticity of this most hallowed shrine in all Christendom. Our Lady’s Holy House at Nazareth was taken by angels to Dalmatia (Croatia) in 1291 to prevent its desecration by the infidels. Three years later it took flight again to rest in Loreto, Italy, where it remains. Rev. Phillips provides the facts, and excitement behind the story. Many cures, apparitions, and miraculous conversions, have happened within the limestone walls of the Santa Casa.

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$5.95
1930278586, Norbert Georges O.P., 54, Paperback

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Norbert Georges, O.P.

Preface

When this little book was composed no one dreamed that it would be an  instrument of God to arouse devotion to Blessed Martin over the English speaking world and bring men to a realization of his right to be a patron of social and interracial justice. As a matter of fact, the interest it has created among English-speaking people has renewed the fervor of the Spanish-speaking people. Peru, in particular, had come to a greater realization of the treasure it possessed, and a governmental decree in November, 1939, declared Blessed Martin national patron of all works of social justice. Requests for literature in Spanish, French, Polish, Italian, German, Slovak and even Russian and Armenian, have come to the office of the Blessed Martin Guild. Everywhere, Blessed Martin is being recognized, not only as a friend in time of need, but also as a star of hope, a leader and a guide in the difficult process of spiritual growth of rehabilitation. This is undoubtedly a sign of God’s approval and  a proof that Blessed Martin is a modern saint with a particular mission at this time when men are so persistently tempted to turn from God and seek their ultimate happiness and destiny in the things of earth. Blessed Martin, by his life, shows conclusively that true peace and happiness can be found only in God, that it can be found in God even by those whom the world despises and who have not the advantages of temporal prosperity and education.
May this little book continue to bring joy to those in sorrow, inspiration to those in doubt, and courage to those who are depressed by suffering and the trials of this world.

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Dom Prosper Guéranger, O.S.B., 280, Sewn Softcover

Dom Prosper Guéranger Abbot of Solesmes

Translated from the French Third Edition by Michael J. Miller

When nineteenth century Christendom shifted its allegiance from a divine vertical authority to the horizontal revolutionary ideals of egalitarian democracy and false liberty, Dom Guéranger’s erudite polemical masterpiece contributed more than any other contemporary work to uphold the papal monarchy in all of its divinely ordained prerogatives. This labor of the holy abbot helped to restore in Catholic Europe the spiritual sword, as well as the magisterial cathedra, to the Vicar of Christ the King. And he did so, not by any clever manipulative abuse of language, but simply by appealing to the simplicity and clarity of the gospels, universal Christian tradition, and the common consensus fidelis. The brilliant hypothetical scenario, drawn by the author, of a college of a dozen apostles, called by Christ, but without a “Cephas” (a Rock) in Peter and his successors, presents even the infant “collegial” church in such an unenviable plight that one might pity them even more than one might pity the Methodists or Seventh Day Adventists, had any of them been at the marriage feast of Cana.

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$4.95
1930278594, The Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, 21, Softcover

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by The Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

There is no dry theologizing in this spirited rebuttal, written in 1974, to defend the clear meaning of the thrice defined dogma: Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (Outside the Church there is No Salvation). What you will read in this exposition is a hearty response, not laced with anything but the truth, as the supreme magisterium has already expounded it, concerning the visible whereabouts of the only means instituted by Jesus Christ for salvation.

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