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A Comparison of the Traditional  and Novus Ordo Rites of the Seven Sacraments

Daniel Graham - 230 pages - EBOOK as PDF

Much has been said lately about the poor catechesis of young Catholics over the past fifty years. One of the most important tools that the Church uses to teach is the words and actions used during the administration of the sacraments. Many Catholics tend to think of the seven sacraments only as channels of grace for living the supernatural life in Christ, but they are also critically important for teaching purposes, since they express the will of God and the doctrines of the Faith in a very concrete fashion. Sacramental moments are the most important in every Catholic life, and every detail of their administration and reception should be as solemn and as perfect as possible.
That they have not been so, and in fact cannot be to the younger generations growing up since Vatican II, is because the new rites do not express the Catholic Faith without ambiguity and confusion. The results are clear to see in the catastrophic decline in practically every statistical and spiritual indicator for the last fifty years. The lack of clarity, erroneous doctrines, protestantized phraseology, and modernist lingo that characterize the new rites makes it fairly certain that a decline of faith and morality will follow inevitably from the reception of the sacraments in the new rites. In fact, we no longer have to predict that result. The history of the last fifty years proves it to be true.
Lex Orandi is a clear and succinct analysis of the differences between the Catholic rites of all seven sacraments as administered from time immemorial and the new rites brutally forced upon the Faithful in the wake of the Council. It is also a call to the Faithful to reject reception of the sacraments in the new rites and demand that their pastors administer the ancient rites as they have always been administered. Church law, and the primary Canonical imperative of lex suprema est salus animarum should compel the Faithful to demand their rights, so that God is honored and souls are saved.

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A Comparison of the Traditional  and Novus Ordo Rites of the Seven Sacraments

Daniel Graham - PB - 230 pages

Much has been said lately about the poor catechesis of young Catholics over the past fifty years. One of the most important tools that the Church uses to teach is the words and actions used during the administration of the sacraments. Many Catholics tend to think of the seven sacraments only as channels of grace for living the supernatural life in Christ, but they are also critically important for teaching purposes, since they express the will of God and the doctrines of the Faith in a very concrete fashion. Sacramental moments are the most important in every Catholic life, and every detail of their administration and reception should be as solemn and as perfect as possible.
That they have not been so, and in fact cannot be to the younger generations growing up since Vatican II, is because the new rites do not express the Catholic Faith without ambiguity and confusion. The results are clear to see in the catastrophic decline in practically every statistical and spiritual indicator for the last fifty years. The lack of clarity, erroneous doctrines, protestantized phraseology, and modernist lingo that characterize the new rites makes it fairly certain that a decline of faith and morality will follow inevitably from the reception of the sacraments in the new rites. In fact, we no longer have to predict that result. The history of the last fifty years proves it to be true.
Lex Orandi is a clear and succinct analysis of the differences between the Catholic rites of all seven sacraments as administered from time immemorial and the new rites brutally forced upon the Faithful in the wake of the Council. It is also a call to the Faithful to reject reception of the sacraments in the new rites and demand that their pastors administer the ancient rites as they have always been administered. Church law, and the primary Canonical imperative of lex suprema est salus animarum should compel the Faithful to demand their rights, so that God is honored and souls are saved.

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Without a doubt, this is the best presentation of the Catholic Faith to non-Catholics available anywhere today. Not only is it a terrific help in sharing our Catholic Faith with others, it contains so much important information that it is a perfect brush-up course for Catholics as well. In simple easy-to-understand language, this wonderful work describes the founding of the Church by Christ, the appointment of Peter as chief shepherd on earth, how the Church came to be called "Catholic," the Protestant rebellion and its causes, the history and proper position of the authority of the Bible, Martin Luther's teachings and the founding of various Protestant churches, the infallibility of the Church and the times and conditions of the infallibility of the Pope, heresies in the Church, good and bad popes, and the conditions of salvation. Present this book to one non-Catholic friend or relative, one friend each month, and watch the fruit of sharing God's greatest gift to us - our Catholic Faith. 63pp. PB

Special discount for 3 or more copies $5.00 each
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This is the best defense of the Catholic Church that we have ever read! A terrific response to Protestant Fundamentalists, every non-Catholic who claims to follow Christ, and especially all of our relatives, friends and neighbors who have stopped practicing the Catholic Faith. Answers a myriad of salvation questions and challenges the liberal Catholic education and training that most Americans have received. Answers with solid, charitable, easy-to-read logic mixed with clear, strong irrefutable doses of Scriptural truth and teachings from the Popes, Councils and Saints. A powerful help in restoring unity in Christ and His Catholic Church and an extremely useful source for settling religious disputes and difficulties with those we care about. Great! Bibliography and Index. 109pp. PB.

Special discount for 10 or more copies $5.21 each

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288, Leather Hard Cover
This beautiful little shirt pocket sized prayerbook is only 3" x 5" and less than 1/2 inch thick, yet it contains almost 300 pages of wonderful prayers. This book contains every prayer, meditation, novena, and Mass for the Holy souls that you could imagine. It is a treasure for those who love the Holy Souls and wish to pray TO and FOR our dearly departed. It was the official Manual of the Purgatorian Society promoted under the auspices of the Redemptorists. This edition was published during the second world war in 1941 and was extremely popular among Catholic Americans during the war years. This is a much nicer and handier version of the paperback edition that Loreto has been selling for years.
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$9.99
   Everyone has a great memory! Most people just never learn how to properly train and use it. This tape will help you. We employ Fr. Feeney’s best teaching...
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Warren H. Carroll, 232, Softcover
The author uses the adjective last proximately, not numerically. This most recent Catholic crusade was fought in Spain in the year 1936. It was fought by the good in hope that a dynasty once proudly called “most Catholic” would rise again to rule this great country. When the Spanish Civil War is dealt with, even in Catholic colleges, the Communist revolutionaries are lauded as freedom fighters, while the loyal Catholic forces under General Franco are dubbed “reactionaries.” The heroic General himself is portrayed a “fascist dictator.” As Carroll demonstrates in this shuddering account of what really happened that year in Spain, this war was not civil at all. The agenda of the forces fighting against Franco was not to liberate an oppressed people, rather it was to bury the monarchy and the Catholic Church. Sending eleven bishops and 6,832 priests and religious to their martyrdoms, they nearly succeeded. This book reads as much like a martyrology as it does Spanish history.
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Butler's Original Lives of the Saints Vol. 4

June & July - Hardcover Illustrated - 806 pages

Putting these invaluable books together in a new and modern format has been a joy for us.  Some of the longest treatises are contained in it. The section on St. Ignatius of Loyola is almost a complete biography!

A great man once said that “History is the laboratory of Wisdom.” And where do we find the best history? It is found in the lives of the saints, for it is through their lives on earth, lived within the union of Christ’s mystical body, the Catholic Church, that we see the only history that truly matters for all eternity.

This spectacular history by Fr. Alban Butler, The Lives of the Saints, presents to the reader the life story of over 1600 saints and their times. In the original introduction we find this bold statement:

“It is on this account we have ventured to designate The Lives of the Saints an historical supplement to the
Old and New Testaments. We think this work deserves to be so considered, on account of the close resemblance it bears to the historical portions of holy writ. Let the divine economy, in this respect, be for a moment the subject of
the reader’s consideration.”
Loreto Publications has here reproduced the finest original edition of the text from the early 19th century with no modernization, alterations, deletions, or additions to the product of Father Butler.

Father Alban Butler was born in 1710, at Appletree, Northamptonshire, the second son of Simon Butler, Esq. Orphaned at the age of eight, he was sent to be educated at the English College, Douay, in France. In 1735, Butler was ordained a priest. At Douay, he was appointed professor of philosophy, and later professor of theology. It was at Douay, he began his principal work The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs and Other Principal Saints. He also prepared material for Richard Challoner’s Memoirs of Missionary Priests, a work on the martyrs of the reign of Elizabeth. He labored for some time as a missionary priest in Staffordshire, and was finally appointed president of the English seminary at Saint Omer in France, where he remained till his death in 1773.

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